Category Archives: AutoImmune

Jennifer evicted her multi-nodular, Hashimoto’s attacked thyroid

I had been struggling with the symptoms for approximately the last three years. I was always cold, experienced unexplained weight gain, severe headaches, digestion problems, losing hair, dry skin, brittle nails, and consistent trouble swallowing. And one of the worst symptoms was the feeling like something was stuck in my throat 24 hours a day. I had to work at even swallowing my own saliva!

About a year and a half ago, I went to my doctor and after an ultrasound they discovered multiple nodules on my thyroid. A FNA biopsy was done and no cancer was found so I was told to follow up in about six months. In the meantime I was told my symptoms could not possibly be contributed to my thyroid.

I had every medical test I could think of to include an Endoscopy, ultrasound, swallow test, blood tests, MRI, and I was even scheduled for a CT scan, but by that point I had given up all hope and didn’t go. I was very discouraged.

My blood tests always came back within the “normal range” so It seemed synthetic thyroid hormones would do me no good.

I finally insisted they test me for antibodies and low and behold I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s. However, even with this diagnosis my blood test came back within the “normal range”, so no medication was prescribed. I was again advised to follow up in a couple of months and I just had to deal with all the symptoms.

For a little while I just gave up and dealt with that until I couldn’t take it anymore and went back to a doctor at a clinic sponsored by my employer. I finally found someone to listen to me and she sent me to a general surgeon. He assured me I wasn’t going crazy and the swallowing issues were in fact likely due to my thyroid nodules. New nodules were also found an a follow-up ultrasound so it was decided I would have a total thyroidectomy on September 28, 2015.

Fast forward to today. I am approximately three weeks out from my surgery and I have zero regrets! There was a fair amount of pain after surgery but nothing compared to what I’ve experienced the last three years. The pain medication took care of it. I was also given levothyroxine immediately after surgery and started it the next day. The surgeon said my thyroid was quite large and had started wrapping around my esophagus and that was why I was having the swallowing issues. He told me with my diseased thyroid out of my body I would begin to feel much better and guess what….

I feel great! feel like I have finally got my life back. I’m able to stay warm, I have energy again, the headaches have decreased drastically, and most importantly I CAN SWALLOW! I am experiencing tightness and swelling in my neck where the incision is, but I have faith that that will soon disappear with time. The scar is minimal and is already starting to fade. I am using silicone strips and they seem to be doing the trick.

I,too, only found horror stories about the surgery and recovery, but I’m happy to share that mine is just the opposite and I have faith I will only continue to improve. I know my medication may need to be adjusted, but right now it seems to be working and I’m very happy with the results.

My only advice is to advocate advocate advocate for yourself. You know your own body and when something feels wrong trust your instincts. I wish I would have pushed to the doctors years ago and not suffered the last couple years but I’m not going to look back I’m just going to look forward and be glad I have been getting my life back.

Thanks for allowing me to share my story and I wish you all the best!



Filed under AutoImmune, Hashimoto's, Nodules

Trina’s TT story – Thyroidectomy due to Autoimmune Issues

We have a fantastic positive post thyroidectomy due to autoimmune issues story today from Trina!!
Thank you, Trina, for sharing your story!!

  • What was the reason for your thyroidectomy? Chronic signs and symptoms that were autoimmune in nature even though all the possible autoimmune disorders ruled out. Plus, thyroid changes on a repeat ultrasound.
  • What age were you when your thyroid was removed? 43—- I am 1 month post-operation.
  • What is your gender? Female

and most importantly of all, here is her positive post thyroidectomy story!

I had dealt with hypothyroidism since 2010 and was on medication for it prior to ever having surgery. However, I continued to be more and more symptomatic. Being a Registered Nurse, I was able to discuss my issues with my primary care physician in great detail and she sent to me to an Endocrine Surgeon. This was ideal because she had the medical experience of an endocrinologist. Based on my history, ultrasound, presenting signs and symptoms she stated that surgery was an acceptable path to take but if I wanted to wait 6 months and get another ultrasound, I could. We discussed everything in detail as well. I made my decision then and there to take it out. After surgery, the surgeon indicated though my blood work never suggested Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis it was obvious my thyroid was inflamed. She said that it could be a form of thyroiditis that has not been discovered yet. My pathology report came back negative for cancer.

I am one month post-op from a Total Thyroidectomy (TT) and I feel wonderful. My long list of symptoms are almost gone. I am warm for the first time, my hands especially, my hair is not falling out like it was, my nails are growing and look healthy, I sleep better, feeling flu like is gone, and puffiness is gone. Best of all the fatigue is gone! I still have some issues left but they will resolve in time. I have not gained any additional weight since surgery.

Many of the forums can sound like doom and gloom that might make you want to back out. Please, do NOT make your decision based on these forums. You have to look at your individual issue and how it is affecting your life. Those who have a TT for hyperthyroidism most likely will experience weight gain after surgery because they have went from a super charged metabolism to all new low metabolism.

Go into your post-op care educated from reputable sources. You have to be mindful of what your body is telling you. It is also important that you educate yourself on your medication. Understand the prescription (Brand name vs Generic) itself and how to take it. You need to avoid doing things that interfere with the drug absorption to get the optimal benefit from your medication. I am hopeful that I will continue to improve every day.

I do not regret having surgery for one second.


Filed under AutoImmune